Sunday, October 28, 2007

Prepare For The Crash

There is a crash coming. The economic and political course we are on cannot be sustained forever. Economically, there is increasing debt at all levels from personal to the federal government, as well as the trade deficit. The increasing cost of energy (which leads to the higher cost of most everything else), medical care and higher education are forcing people into ever more debt. More and more people are living tenuously from paycheck to paycheck, just one disaster away from ending up living in a cardboard box in the middle of a field. Politically we are making more and more enemies around the world by sticking our nose into other people's business and telling them what to do. Eventually it will come to an end and things will come crashing down around us. I do not know when it will happen; it may be sooner or it may be later, but it is best to begin to prepare for it now.

It will be an economic crash, to be sure. As bad as or worse than the one in 1929, for anyone old enough to remember. Most of us will end up unemployed and poor or even broke. But it will also be a crash of society, civility and government. Our society is simply not the same as it was eight decades ago. The acute shortages of basic necessities will pit people against each other and against the government. Imagine the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, but on a national or even global scale. The crash may come quietly, but odds are it will be triggered by either a large-scale natural disaster or another attack on our homeland. It will begin here in the U.S. but may spread worldwide.

So how does one prepare?

The first thing is to be prepared as you would for a natural disaster. have a supply of non-perishable food on hand that can last for weeks or months, along with a way to prepare it. Arm yourself with some good guns and ammunition. Keep some cash on hand as well. Beyond that, here are some other things you can do:

1) Get of debt and stay out. If you are in debt, do not add to it and work to get out. If you are not in debt, stay out of it. Do not buy anything beyond the necessities...food, basic clothing, basic shelter and basic transportation. The new car, computer or big-screen tv...forget it! Those items will be of no value once the crash happens. Even a college education may be of little or no value then. I feel that coming out of college and starting your life already in debt is a really bad idea.

2) Support local businesses. Buy your basic goods and services as close to home as possible. Not on the internet and not in another city. This saves energy and money, but more importantly, these local businesses....if they survive, may be all you have to rely on after the crash for things you need.

3) Forsake technology. Computers and the internet, cell phones, TV are all great, for now. But none of them may work after the crash. I already regret buying this computer a year ago. It just put me in more debt and could have probably done without. Should have just put up with the old piece of crap that crashed every time I used it. So don't bother spending money on upgrades or new items; they may end up being worthless.

4) Don't expect the government or insurance to help. These institutions may not even exist after the crash. And if they do...as we have already seen, they have their own agenda and don't give a hoot about the little guy.

5) MOST IMPORTANT: If you are one of the fortunate who have plenty after the crash, be willing to help those of your neighbors who do not. If you have nothing, do not rob or kill for food. That is what animals do...not humans. It is better to die hungry than to murder another man for his food.

Good luck


So Sayeth The Shack

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4 comments:

Jeni said...

Gosh, I would hate to see such dire "doom and gloom" happen but considering the current economic state, it sure does seem like a possibility. Back to the barebones basics so I best make sure I still have some garden spades, rakes, hoes, etc -and figure out where to plant a decent garden too then. That's what pulled my grandparents through back during the "Great Depression" was my Grandpa's gardening abilities - and my Grandma's knowledge about canning too.

The Shack said...

Be careful with "spades and hoes" some people don't like that kinda talk ya know what I mean....

So many people now live in cities and don't have a place to put a garden and don't know the first thing about gardening...wonder what they'll do.

Jess said...

Great article. I've been hearing people talk about this more and more. Some say the recession will be bad, but not that bad. Others say it could be the same or worse than the Great Depression. The difference between now and then is that back in the 1920's the dollar was backed by gold. Today it's not really backed by anything of value so as much as I'd like to hope for a cushy recession the grim reality is it very well could be a repeat of the Depression, or worse.

Since no one can really say for sure it doesn't hurt to prepare. Having a supply of food like you suggested is good. I don't have much of a green thumb but I've been learning how to garden the past few years so if it comes to the point that my family depends on whatever I can grow I'll be able to feed them something.

I remember my Grandpa telling me about the Depression and how they were so poor they couldn't afford shoes. When the soles would get worn out they'd cut cardboard and put that inside. I'll be darned if my kids go without shoes. I've been stalking the sale and clearance racks at stores, as well as garage sales, and buying nice but cheap clothing for my boys years ahead of when they'll actually need them. Keep it all stored in the garage. That way if the economy collapses they'll have what they need. If it doesn't I won't have to buy that stuff later as the dollar inflates and everything costs more.

The Shack said...

My parents lived during the Depression and as a result they practiced modest frugality. Too bad I didn't learn from their example. Guess I "thought money grew on trees" or something like that. My garden this year is a big disappointment; we would starve if we had to live off of it!